The Best Diet Part III

Welcome to the final installment of the best diet series. If you missed them, read part I and part II before moving onto this part. In this part, I will lay out the most important factors when considering which ‘diet’ to undergo. 

WHAT A SUCCESSFUL DIET REALLY MEANS

As you should know by now, there is no such thing as a ‘perfect’ diet. Not a single eating plan can possibly cover all of the possibilities and preferences of each person. On the other hand, there may be a ‘perfect’ diet for you at a certain time in your life/career. The key is to make sure it works for as long as you want it to. Of course, you will know if a diet works for you based on physiological and psychological assessments. Once you reach a goal, it will be time to either re-evaluate whether you should stick to the said diet or move on to bigger things.

To move towards finding the right eating plan for you there are a few general caveats to know if you want to to translate what the mountain of research has come up with. Each of the below points should be considered guiding principles when evaluating whether you would have success on a specific diet.

  1. It’s healthful. In other words, a good diet will make you look at what you’re eating. Remember the Twinkie Diet above? If your main goal is weight-loss, you can eat 800 calories of junk food per day and lose weight. In the respect, it works. However, it’s not enough to just control calories anymore. You can lose weight eating Twinkies all day, but how sustainable is that for your health? Diet quality matters, especially if you want to promote health and keep off any weight you lost.

 

  1. It’s individualized. A good diet should take into consideration your metabolic condition and lifestyle. In other words, a good diet should take into consideration your diabetes or high-level athletics. Diets should not be cookie-cutter. There is no such thing as a one-size fits all diet, although there may be slight variations between you and the next person. If you’re diabetic, it would make very little sense to eat the same way as a healthy, lean, and active person. Additionally, what type of activity are you doing? Are you an endurance runner, a weight-lifter, a sprinter, a dancer, or a coach potato? Certain sports necessitate more or less of nutrients for optimal performance.

 

  1. It’s fulfilling. A good diet should fulfill your body’s requirements for protein, fats, and carbohydrates without overfeeding you (unless your goal is to become a larger version). By keeping in mind that proteins and fats are more satiating than carbohydrates, you can then construct a weight-loss plan that can control hunger better while improving nutrient intake. In fact, carbohydrates are not technically necessary since the body can create it through an indigenous process, but it’s fulfilling because carbohydrates are required to optimize metabolic function and hedonism. And if you’re an athlete, carbohydrates are indispensable for optimal performance and body composition.

 

  1. It’s sustainable. Research shows that over 90% of people cannot stick to a diet for more than two years. I surmise this is probably because most people don’t know how to choose what diet is best for them and how to adjust a diet based on their preferences. Not knowing how to transition explains in large part why high-level athletes become fat and sick once they become working members of society. This is also a huge problem for high-school athletes going into college — ever heard of the Freshman-15? If Michael Phelps were to stop swimming but maintained his monstrous in-season training caloric intake, his ability to float would surpass his ability to swim in the blink of an Olympic second.

 

This last point is especially important in light of health-promoting diets. If you can’t stick to a diet, then it’s no good. If you go on a diet and lose 10% of your excess fat mass but gain it all back in two years, you’re no better at the finish than you were at the start. Think Biggest Loser. Somewhere there are reports of the contestants developing eating disorders and tipping the scales even more than when they started the show.

Having the “best” diet yet not sticking to it is like having a Bentley collecting dust in your garage. It’s nice to talk about and show people you have this “awesome” thing you can always turn to, but if you’re not going to use it to make yourself a better person, then it’s useless.

Please, don’t let this car collect dust. Source

Mediterranean, Paleo, vegan, Weight Watchers, low-carbohydrate, DASH, or any of the other slick Amazon best-sellers will help you become healthier and leaner. But underneath the veil of the fancy names and acronyms, most successful diets have the above things in common.

SO AGAIN, WHAT IS THE BEST DIET? USE THIS ANSWER.

It depends—whatever is working right now for whatever goals I have, and I should be able to stick to it”. It all boils down to context-dependent effectiveness and preference. Anything outside of that is just minor detail.

The answer probably is not as pretty as a dozen roses, but it’s the truth. You can force-feed yourself a diet you don’t like to lose the extra fat on your left eyelid, but what happens after you meet your goal? Are you going to stick to the diet? Do you know how to eat afterward? Do you know how to eat if you have a medical condition? Do these questions seem like a bunch of pester to you compared to what you should Tweet or tag on Facebook? Making dietary changes is a lifelong process, but it’s one that brings highly coveted awards. Stick with it.

As always I appreciate feedback, comments, and input. What is your perception of a good diet?

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